top of page

Noir Disco share "Settin' Sons" Music Video Alongside the Release of Debut Album

"Settin' Sons," which premiered via Under the Radar Magzine earlier this month, opens with spangled acoustic guitar before erupting into something bigger introducing warbling electric guitar and programmed drum beats. It finds the trio leaning into their psych-rock-adjacent sounds more than anywhere else on the record, producing one of its more tender, introspective moments.


Speaking about the making of the new smoment for the band because it was then we realized that Carter is Rocky, Nolan is Mick and Henry is Pauly, characters from the American classic movie series Rocky." The brothers who sing and play alongside their friend, Henry Miller have developed something of a cult following over the year; NOW! 2073 marks their grandest project yet, signposting the band’s evolution into a new freeform way of creating. Taking direct inspiration from artists like David Bowie, Kate Bush and The Doors, the new music similarly submerges you in cartoonish art-pop landscapes (think “Happiness Is A Warm Gun” if it was made by Arcade Fire during their Reflektor era) that seem to evolve in real-time. The Dickson brother grew up in a disciplined Catholic household in the Chicago suburbs. When they weren’t goofing around, delivering hymns like Les Misérables songs in church, the pair were practicing as part of a triathlon team. It’s fair to say the discipline involved in both religion and sports was sometimes difficult to endure. “Catholicism and elite athletics are two very painful scenarios for a child to go through,” Nolan explains, “but I would say it’s where we got our knack for fantasy because our imagination allowed us to escape from reality.” Purchase Noir Disco's NOW! 2073 at this link here



Whether it’s tackling our hard-coded addiction to television, the hollowness of 21st-century hipsters, or even the concept of mortality, Noir Disco’s genre-blurring new album, NOW! 2073 – out December 3 via Terrible Records – consistently transforms weighty concepts and emotions into new age anthems that make you feel warm and fuzzy. The brainchild of brothers Nolan and Carter Dickson, who sing and play alongside friend Henry Miller, the band have already developed a cult fanbase. However, NOW! 2073 feels like their fullest project yet, marking the band’s evolution into a new freeform way of creating. “The title track [“2073”] was the first time we made a song just by passing the microphone around and making up lyrics on the spot,” admits Nolan. “It felt like a magical moment and [after that] nearly all the songs were created through the spirit of improvisation. In fact, that’s the only way we make music now. Me and Carter live in one big constantly evolving joke and, with this album, we wanted to bring people into it.” Taking direct inspiration from artists like David Bowie, Kate Bush, and The Doors, the new music similarly submerges you in cartoonish art-pop landscapes (think “Happiness Is A Warm Gun” if it was made by Arcade Fire during their Reflektor era… and you’re not too far off) that seem to evolve in real-time. A kaleidoscope of bright colors and snark, “Taking Off” is a bit like the adult equivalent of creating a live movie in your childhood bedroom with toy guns and invisible co-stars. Nolan and Carter improvise their own space odyssey (“Start the engines, captain” says Nolan, “Alright Nolan, I’m going to need you to stay cool in this astral pool!” replies Carter) amid tropical mellow synths and psychedelic barbershop quartet harmonies that make you feel stoned, even without smoking. Meanwhile, “21st Century Hipster Man” mixes the rawness of lo-fi indie with a syrupy, festival-ready hook, as Nolan warmly coos: “It feels so good when we talk about how good we are” like it’s the communal “Hey Jude” outro reimagined for TikTokers. “That lyric is about how much I rely on external validation online. I am really acknowledging it and owning it!” says Nolan. “As much as we love our dad, he was a preachy motherfucker, so we are very sensitive to that. Instead, we try to identify with societal issues so they feel more approachable and less scary. It’s like… we’re all in this together and it’s okay to feel this way, you know?” The brothers, who finish each other’s sentences and are only two years apart, grew up in a disciplined Catholic household in the Chicago suburbs. When they weren’t goofing around, delivering hymns like Les Misérables songs in church, the pair were practicing as part of a triathlon team. It’s fair to say the discipline involved in both religion and sports was sometimes difficult to endure. “Catholicism and elite athletics are two very painful scenarios for a child to go through,” Nolan explains, “but I would say it’s where we got out a knack for fantasy because our imagination allowed us to escape from reality.” He continues: “I remember going home from church in the family car and my Dad would always put Abbey Road on. When me and my brother heard “Maxwell’s Silver Hammer” the wit and the harmonies just opened up our minds, completely. We wanted to make music like that, too, and it wasn’t long until we were making music together in our bedroom, learning how to play all the instruments. I guess we’ve never really stopped experimenting.” There’s a continuation of this childlike invention present on the massive first single “Television”, which was inspired by smoking spliffs while reading Aldous Huxley’s dystopian sci-fi novel Brave New World. Essentially a thinking man’s rave, the high-energy track features a spoken-word monologue from Carter, who does a 5-4-3-2-1 countdown like a news station anchor about to go live on air, with the song suddenly exploding into life shortly after. Of the Todd Terje-channelling track, which arguably contains some of the record’s most profound lyricism (“I feel good about what I watch cus its not my life”), Nolan enthuses: “Capitalism has perfected how to make you avoid your misery, with the explosion of streaming services like Netflix acting as a strange kind of meditation. “Television” taps into all of that. My favorite thing about pop, rock or electronic music is when it becomes complex and dense yet is still easy to follow.” Another highlight is the sparse “Hungry”, where Carter resurrects the dirty beatnik poet spirit of Jim Morrison to playfully philosophize: “It’s like the omnipotent modern age sucks the will right out of your cock and licks its lips til’ you cum and pass out and wake up with a collar and leash like the catatonic cuck you are to your dreams.” Full of cheeky attitude, but also regret, the song was intended by Carter to convey what it’s like to try to sober up and why it is okay to say no to going out. On this track, he doesn’t twitch in anticipation for drugs and booze, but rather the prospect of a nourishing home-cooked meal. Much like those classic Doors’ rock operas, the 6-minute plus “Television” feels like it could go on for at least another 10 minutes, with its clever pop delivered with an unpredictable jazz sensibility. In a world where high-octane, barely two minutes, angsty songs are dominating the charts, Noir Disco wants to do something different. “We’re not trying to do something short and sweet. “Our sweet spot is albums filled with songs that are like 5 minutes long, where you can really submerge yourself in the different worlds and escape your reality. Our modern influences are people like Tame Impala, Arcade Fire, Mac DeMarco, LCD Soundsystem, and Ariel Pink, who all do the same sort of thing. They all make you think but also smile.” And of the band’s name, Nolan reveals: “We liked the idea of a band name that was a genre in itself. Film noir is one of the most superior and artistic facets of cinema, while disco is all about losing yourself on the dancefloor. I like the idea of combining those two very different things. I guess the name quickly shows you we’ll never conform to any one genre. It’s about those juxtapositions that we love exploring.” Whatever the future holds, and it’s very likely this record will propel Noir Disco to new heights, Nolan says he’s just happy to have found his musical groove alongside his favorite person: his brother. He offers newbies to Noir Disco the following tempting call-to-action: “Songs like “Los Angeles” were made with an awareness that every single person wants to feel like the main character in their own movie. If you close your eyes and listen to these songs then you’re going to star in a pretty cool piece of theatre, trust me!” So, what are you waiting for? Start the engines, Captain.

3 views0 comments

Comments


bottom of page